Home > H. Bloggers & Blogging, NN. Occasions > RT’s Finest Posts, 2013 (Part 1)

RT’s Finest Posts, 2013 (Part 1)

File:Make-do Dolls For Christmas- Wartime Recycling, 1943 D17282.jpg

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Tis the season, and RT has a lot to choose from this year; in fact, he’s overwhelmed by his output in the first half of the year. Count ’em, baby, count ’em: 138 posts in January and February 2013 alone! With such an abundance to choose from, RT has thought it wise to offer a selection from the year’s first two months by itself, then move farther into the year in his next post. He’s got a range of material, and hopes everyone enjoys his choices!   RT

January

1) Scottish Gaelic, Manx, and the Crawling of Crabs. Ned Maddrell’s take on the importance of speaking Manx, along with other reasons to respect (and learn) a minority language.

2) Look at Me (a poem). An intense encounter of the romantic kind.

3) Dr. Michel Royon: Uncovering the Beauty of Nature. Two simply amazing photographs of seashells; Royon’s work takes the genre to a new level.

4) More Than a Pretty Face. Beauty can take us by surprise.

5) A Finch’s Mandible and the Intimate Life. Further speculations on the origins of language and its connections with place. (Or, What Did He Say?)

February

1) Denis Diderot and the Book that Changed the World. Think intellectuals are wasting their time, engaging in belly-button staring and whatnot? Here’s one who rocked the world to its foundations.

2) Louise Duttenhofer–Cut Paper Artist. A wonderful artist, pretty much unknown in America–and an article translated from German with many an assist from Google Translate. Wow!

3) Szechenyi Thermal Bath. A slice of life with a healthy dash of humor.

4) Beyond the Valley of the Apocalypse Donkeys. More humor, an excellent book review, and a resource for finding great small-press books.

5) Letterform–Three Characteristics. Three ways of looking at an alphabetic letter.

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And how could RT end this post without a stocking stuffer?

1) The Vogels: Collecting Art as if Your Life Depending on it. A New York City couple who, on a distinctly limited income, became patrons of avant-garde art.

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Image: Make-Do Dolls for Christmas–1943. Author: Ministry of Information Photo Division Photographer. WikiCmns. Public Domain.

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