Home > 1. Famous Poems, 3. My Poetry & Translations > Du Fu and the Greatest Line in Chinese Poetry

Du Fu and the Greatest Line in Chinese Poetry

Dong Yuan. River landscape.National Palace Museum, Beijing.jpg

Sometimes things come undone. There’s always a reason, but the important thing is to work through the problem, however long that might take. The opening line of this poem (which RT has divided into two lines), by the master poet Du Fu, is generally considered the greatest in Chinese poetry. Suffering sometimes brings wisdom, and even beauty. RT

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Spring and Autumn Report

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The great palace lies in ruins;

mountains and rivers look on.

Weeds like silk piled high

adorn empty cities—

in the chaos, even flowers weep.

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I’ve heard nothing from my family—

but enough of this!

The alarum of birds soothes my heart.

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Three months have passed

and still the beacon fires burn;

I’d pay gold for a single letter.

Frustrated, I scratch my head,

pull loose a handful of hair.

The hairpin dangles.

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version, © The Rag Tree, 2015

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Painting: River Landscape. Dong Yuan, 10th Century. National Palace Museum, Taipei. WikiCmns; Public Domain.

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  1. April 8, 2016 at 2:58 am

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