Du Fu, Take 2

This poem, by Du Fu, China’s greatest poet, continues to haunt RT. The version below isn’t his first attempt at bringing the poem over into English, and certainly the poem’s reputation (its opening lines are generally considered to be the greatest ever written in Chinese poetry) has something to do with his interest. Or it may simply be that the poem is being given to RT slowly, line by line. An improvement over his previous attempt? RT will let his readers judge …

Spring Thoughts

 

The Great Palace lies in ruins;

mountains reflect, rivers pass on.

In cities, weeds like silk pile up,

and rain slaps the flower’s cheek.

But enough of this!

Birdsong astonishes my heart.

 

Three months have passed

and still the beacon fires burn.

I’d pay pure gold for a letter.

Raking my head, exasperated,

I pull loose my scholar’s knot.

The hairpin dangles.

*

PaintingEmperor Xuanzong of Tang fleeing to Sichuan province from Chang’an; painter unknown. 11th century. WikiCmns. Public Domain.

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  1. April 8, 2016 at 3:59 am

    superb

    • April 8, 2016 at 6:20 pm

      S_j: thanks for the encouragement; it really helps…. RT

  2. May 6, 2016 at 1:09 am

    ‘Birdsong astonishes my heart’ – centuries have passed since this was written and truth of it is still absolutely riveting.

  3. May 10, 2016 at 9:17 pm

    aubrey: no poet can ask for more than the praise of the verbally gifted…as always, thanks! RT

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